Posted in refugees

Crumbs from our table

The reading from Matthew’s gospel set for today is a tough read. Jesus is approached by a woman who is a foreigner – and described by Matthew as a Canaanite, the ancient enemies of Israel. She’s shouting, demanding help for her daughter. The disciples urge Jesus to get rid of this nuisance, and he agrees – ‘I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel’. You’d have thought that would be enough to put her off, but she comes again, and kneels in front of Jesus. His response – to insult her further, using the racial slur of his day for non-Jews: ‘it’s not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs’. And in her grief and desperation and humility the woman takes the slur, and rather than rejecting it she turns it around: ‘even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table’. And it is that which makes the difference. Jesus praises her faith, and heals the woman’s daughter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get rid of them! They’re a threat to our identity, our jobs! Pull up the drawbridge, our own resources are just for us! Jesus’ disciples, and Jesus himself, sound in this gospel reading like first century versions of those who are happy to see asylum seekers ‘pushed back’ – or even left to drown. But that is not where the gospel story ends – and it’s not the message of Matthew’s gospel. Matthew is the most Jewish gospel – rooted in the Hebrew Scriptures, arguing passionately that Jesus is the fulfillment of Israel’s promise. For Matthew, this is indeed good news for the house of israel. But all the way through, from the beginning to the end, there is a counter-theme of faith coming from unexpected places, from the people who shouldn’t be part of the story. From the Gentile women in Jesus’ genealogy to the centurion at his death, the story of salvation keeps on including those who were not part of the Jewish people.

There is no Christian option for rejecting those in need. However much we feel the natural and human desire to put up the barriers and lock the doors, the gospel is clear that if we do so we are not following the example of Jesus. Do we want people to pay criminals to enable them to embark on hazardous journeys across the English Channel? Of course not. But while the United Kingdom makes it impossible for people to claim asylum here except by getting into the country – and smiultaneously makes it near impossible for anyone to do so – we leave those who are desperate no choice. We force them to accept our prejudiced view, making them ‘illegal migrants’ by denying any dignified or humane route. We aren’t willing to share even crumbs from our table. as a nation we should be praying again in repentance:

We are not worthy

so much as to gather up the crumbs under your table.

But you are the same Lord

whose nature is always to have mercy.

Posted in Asylum, refugees

Joyful Resistance: welcoming Refugee Week

‘One of the most dangerous consequences of injustice is that it crushes the joy out of our lives.’

A lot of us have been counting the pennies a bit more closely over the last few months even than normal. If you’re furloughed, or you’ve lost your job – or if you’re anticipating that your income’s going to be going down rather than up – you’re one of a large and increasing number. At least there has been some relief for those most in need, as Universal Credit and Working Tax Credit levels were increased by about £20 per week at the beginning of the lockdown. That seemed fair and reasonable.

A few days ago, the government finally announced an increase to the support given to people who are claiming asylum in this country. Remember, they are not allowed to work, or to claim any other benefits. The increase? £1.85 per week – to the giddy heights of £37.75. That is supposed to cover a week’s worth of food, clothing, toiletries, travel, etc. – everything you need to live on except housing costs. And it’s not just for a few days – a claim for asylum can take many months to be processed by the Home Office. Could you live on under £40 a week? Every week? You can’t do it by putting off paying for more expensive items, because it’ll be the same next week, and the week after that …

We can’t ignore the effects of prejudice here. The majority of asylum seekers in 2018 came from Iran (3,320), Iraq (2,700), Eritrea (2,151), Pakistan (2,033), and Albania (2,005). I cannot imagine that we would treat people in this way if they looked and spoke like the White British majority. Asylum seekers are given the message in this country, by the way in which we treat them, that their lives do not matter very much – that the main aim of the process is to find a way of getting rid of them.

image

There are plenty of groups protesting against such policies, and rightly so, but I want in this blog to focus on something which doesn’t sound like protest at all. The danger when you’re protesting on behalf of someone else is that you forget that they are just as capable, interesting, able and creative as you are; they can become an object of your help, not quite really an equal any more. Refugee Week, which runs from 15-21 June, is an opportunity to celebrate the gifts of people from all around the world, including those who have been forced to seek refuge elsewhere than their own home country. In lockdown, there’s not the opportunity to meet in person, but on the other hand it’s possible to tune in to events happening all across the country – like the Sheffield-based Migration Matters Online Festival (https://www.migrationmattersfestival.co.uk/). Or from Manchester: a series of multi-lingual digital arts workshops for children, with refugee and migrant artists devising, delivering and filming a range of work including: story-telling, music, craft activities (https://www.youtube.com/user/CommunityArtsNW). Creativity knows no boundaries, it levels us all up in our common human identity, and even in the context of pervasive injustice it can enable us to break out into joy. And for the first time this year, there will be an Hour of Prayer with and for refugees hosted by Christian refugee organisations (https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/national-refugee-prayer-hour-on-world-refugee-day-tickets-108081282024).

One of the most dangerous consequences of injustice is that it crushes the joy out of our lives, most of all for those directly suffering, but also for all those who are passionate about seeking justice. When human dignity is denied, it’s all the more important to keep on celebrating, because by doing so we witness to the fullness of all that racial prejudice and ‘hostile environments’ seek to deny. Protesting against injustice is about living our lives differently. At the heart of overcoming prejudice in ourselves and in our communities is the breaking down of boundaries that we see most perfectly fulfilled in the resurrection life: ‘In that renewal there is no longer Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, Scythian, slave or free; but Christ is all an in all’ (Colossians 3:11). It is that unity of all in Christ that we witness to, by opposing all that denies the full humanity of another child of God.

So I encourage you joyfully to embrace all that is given by people of other cultures – whatever your own background may be, and to challenge the dismal injustice that tries to grind people down so that they are unable to live full and human lives. Do we really value human lives so little that it is right that people should try to struggle by on £37.75 per week? No, we cannot. Enjoy Refugee Week, and allow yourself to be enriched by the great diversity of God’s creativity exhibited in many languages and cultures. And then, do not forget. https://refugeeweek.org.uk/ 

Posted in refugees, spirituality

Not looking away

Recently I was asked if I could write something for the Fellowship of Contemplative Prayer about praying contemplatively amid the disorder of our world. This is what I wrote.

 

Contemplative prayer is about looking. That’s what the word means. The call to contemplative prayer is to remain focused (another visual image), to bring your attention back time and again as it flits away, to that point of attention which can become the place in which we know ourselves to be seen and loved by God.

After I was asked to write this article, I did a little research of my own and came across  an article quoting some of the more surprising and difficult verses that Robert Coulson, the Fellowship’s founder, had used in his own prayer – verses such as “I will visit upon you the evil of your doings” (Jer 23.2 RV). As the article pointed out, these are verses “that we personally would find challenging, if not impossible, to use in our contemplative prayer time”.

Those verses were of judgement, verses which challenge our sense of ourselves as loved by God. Especially because of our own knowledge that some of our doings are indeed evil, we find it almost impossible to stay with verses like these.

But if we can move in deeper, I think a verse like this can in fact take us closer to God, through the path of mourning. I’d like to invite you if you can to stay with this image in prayer.

This is a picture of the former “Jungle” Camp in Calais before its demolition.
The Jungle, and other even more squalid encampments which have followed it, are our attempt to turn our collective eyes aw2015-11-14 15.20.27ay from those who have come to Europe – some seeking asylum, some “merely” escaping from poverty. We in the UK turn our eyes away by making it uniformly difficult for anyone to get into the country, however justified their claim might be. You can only claim asylum on UK territory – and without travel documents (which most asylum seekers won’t have, naturally) there is no legal way to get here. So people wash around our fortified borders, looking for a way in.

The Jungle was a place of squalor and desperation and danger – and also of extraordinary acts of love and mutual service. But you could only find that love, those signs of God’s presence, by staying with the ugliness and the pain. If you do not look away, but look for God here, you have no choice but to mourn the disorder in our world which has led so many people to prefer this life to the life they were leading in their countries of origin. And in that mourning you cannot help but find that you, like me, like all of us, are not separate from that disorder. We are all implicated; we are all guilty. And there is no simple, easy answer, but there is forgiveness, and so there is hope.

The prayer of contemplative mourning is not one of self-loathing. Seeing, staying with the pain of our world, and acknowledging that we are part of the cause of that pain, is also a way of opening ourselves to be a source of healing. There were extraordinary people in the Jungle, some migrants themselves, others from the UK and across Europe, who dedicated themselves to bringing what hope they could. As you all know, it is not just the active life of service which brings the love of God into the world; the contemplative life is an equally vital, if more mysterious, means of God’s grace. In the painful prayer of mourning, the healing of the world is brought nearer.

Posted in refugees

Welcome to Britain! Here’s the bill

The UK’s Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration is investigating the Home Office’s charging for services in respect of its asylum, immigration, nationality and customs functions. Still bothering to read? You should be.

So, imagine you are a refugee who has recently been granted leave to remain in the UK, you and your spouse and children. You may well have had a senior and well-paid job in your country of origin, but in all likelihood you arrived here with nothing, and your qualifications aren’t recognised in this country. But this is where you want to belong, where you want to be your home country, the place to which you are committed for life. So you take whatever work you can, probably minimum wage, but better than nothing. You get along, just, from month to month, but it’s a struggle.

And then, naturally enough, you want to express that commitment by becoming a British citizen. You realise these processes aren’t completely free. And being of an enquiring turn of mind, you find out about other countries too, just out of interest. If you were in Belgium, it would cost you €200 (currently about £177). If you were in the United States, it would cost you $725 (about £550). In France it’s just €55. And in the UK – £1,330. And if you make one mistake on your form, the application will be turned down without refund. Children are a bargain at a mere £1,012.

You’re told that this is because of the great benefits that citizenship will bring you. and you wonder – is UK citizenship really 27 times more valuable than French? And you also  think – that’s all very well if you’ve got capital to invest, but I don’t, and no-one is yet offering low interest loans on citizenship application fees to people on low and precarious incomes.

You know already, through personal experience, that the UK makes it tough for anyone who wants to get here to claim asylum, unless you’re lucky enough to be included in one of the resettlement programmes. But you’re through that now; no need for a hostile (or even ‘compliant’) environment any more. So what’s all this about?

You try to do some research – and you find a quotation from a research project which makes you even more perplexed:

Research has demonstrated that achieving citizenship is important in migrant integration and social cohesion, among other benefits for both migrants and communities in which they live; cultivating a loyalty amongst migrants for their new home country and its values

So do the government not want me to be loyal? Do they not want me to become integrated into my new society? Do they really, still, not want me at all?

Posted in Poverty and Justice, refugees

When they needed a neighbour

I’m proud today to have had a part in the letter from many leaders of many faiths, encouraging the government to adopt a more generous and inclusive policy towards those who seek asylum in this country. You can find the letter here, and coverage of it here and here – and these are my reflections:

Our government is committed to offering asylum to those who come to this country and who have a genuine claim. It is even more committed to preventing them from doing so. Successive governments have made it more and difficult for anyone to get here in order to make a claim: the ‘wall of Calais’ is just the latest attempt. We levy heavy fines on those who transport people to this country without passports and visas – and those genuinely in need of asylum are exactly the ones who can’t get documents to allow them to travel. We take advantage of the fact that few asylum seekers can get here direct, to insist they should have made their claim somewhere else.

The result? We drive asylum seekers into the hands of people traffickers. Those who only have to spend all their resources are the lucky ones – they didn’t die along the way. We increase the profits from organised crime. I hope that very few people, as individuals, would treat another human being that way. And it’s still wrong when it’s done by the government on our behalf.

There are simple things the government could do which would have a huge impact. To issue humanitarian visas so that people could come here to have their claim assessed, so that refugees don’t have to risk their lives to reach their families. To reduce the many restrictive rules that prevent families from being re-united, by preventing lone refugee children from bringing their parents to the UK, and making it extremely difficult even for adult British citizens to do so.

These changes would be neither expensive nor impossibly complex. In Italy, the government is working in alliance with churches and charities to issue visas in the Middle East and North Africa which allow those seeking asylum to avoid the traffickers. On arrival, the sponsoring churches look after the new arrivals, teaching them the language and helping them become integrated into the community. In this country likewise, there are thousands who have family members still in areas of conflict, there are hundreds of churches, mosques and charities who would be glad to offer sponsorship or support. But the UK government isn’t interested.

These moves should not be controversial. The wonder to me is that we have ever put in place measures which divide families in this way. The leaders of many faiths who have written today to the Prime Minister have done so in the conviction that the proposals we make are in the best interests of our country as well as those we should be reaching out to help. All our faiths compel us to affirm the dignity of all human beings, and to offer help to anyone in need. We rejoice in the mosaic of different faiths and British communities that we now represent. Some of us came to this country from other countries of birth; others, like myself, have been British for many generations. But we all recognize that the best of this country is represented by the generosity, kindness, solidarity and decency that Britain has at many times shown those fleeing persecution, even at times of far greater deprivation and difficulty than the present day. The U.K. should be proud to take its fair share of refugees, as we have done in the past, to exhibit to those in most need the very best of Britain.

 

Posted in Poverty and Justice, refugees, Roman Catholic Church, spirituality

Year of Mercy – Year of Welcome?

Yesterday, December 8th, was the beginning of the Year of Mercy called by Pope Francis. It was also a day of prayer and vigil for refugees, organised by the Churches’ Refugee Network and generously hosted by St Margaret’s Westminster. The Vigil was entitled 20,000 Welcomes – alluding both to the traditional Irish greeting, and to the 20,000 Syrian refugees that the UK government has decided to allow to resettle here. During the vigil, the following reading was read, and I offered the meditation that follows

When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory. All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats, and he will put the sheep at his right hand and the goats at the left. Then the king will say to those at his right hand, ‘Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you something to drink? And when was it that we saw you a stranger and welcomed you, or naked and gave you clothing? And when was it that we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?’ And the king will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.’ Then he will say to those at his left hand, ‘You that are accursed, depart from me into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels; for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not give me clothing, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not take care of you?’ Then he will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’ And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.

Matthew 25:31-46

Jesus comes to judge the world, and he doesn’t ask people how religious they were – at least not in the sense of going to church a lot, reading their Bible, even praying. Those whom Jesus praises are those who lived lives given to serving others – particularly those who were despised or ignored by everybody else. They visited prisoners, cared for the sick, looked after the people who were at the bottom of the heap. In fact, they did exactly the sort of things that Jesus did. I can’t imagine that any of them managed to do all that without having lives that were radically dependent on God: but the proof of all that was in lives which were lived in love for the world. They receive their reward through being the sort of people who didn’t look for it. They weren’t aware that they were serving Jesus when they helped people in trouble; they weren’t doing it in order to tot up spiritual points. They just did what needed doing.

These, along with providing burial for the dead, are six of the seven corporal (bodily and physical) acts of mercy, and they all flow from this parable:

To feed the hungry

To give drink to the thirsty

To clothe the naked

To shelter the homeless

To visit the sick

To visit the imprisoned

Today has begun the Roman Catholic Church’s Year of Mercy – a year of receiving, and also giving and living, the boundless mercy of God. As Pope Francis put it in his letter setting out his vision for the year

I have asked the Church in this Jubilee Year to rediscover the richness encompassed by the spiritual and corporal works of mercy. The experience of mercy, indeed, becomes visible in the witness of concrete signs as Jesus himself taught us. Each time that one of the faithful personally performs one or more of these actions, he or she shall surely obtain the Jubilee Indulgence

Whether or not we are Roman Catholic, the Pope’s call should have resonance for us. We will connect most readily, many of us, with that encouragement to continue in the practice of mercy, and to encourage others to join with us in offering 20,000 welcomes. But we should also hear that other side of the Pope’s call – that we should be ready to receive the mercy of God in our own lives as well.

That action will take different forms for us according to our own traditions and spiritualities. For some the Pope’s call to renew the sacrament of confession will be a gateway to God’s grace and freedom; for others there will be other ways – the grace of God is confined only by our willingness or not to receive it. But receive it we must, if we are to have grace and mercy to share. The commitment to continue in the acts of mercy is demanding and sometimes draining. We have all met, and probably all sometimes been, those people who are still giving when they have nothing left to give – and we know that that is not sustainable, or healthy, or good.

We need to allow ourselves to receive acts of mercy as well as to give them, if we are to live out the spirit of the gospel reading. It is not for nothing that the corporal acts of mercy are linked with the spiritual acts – traditionally they are

To instruct the ignorant.

To counsel the doubtful.

To admonish sinners.

To bear wrongs patiently.

To forgive offences willingly.

To comfort the afflicted.

To pray for the living and the dead

The spiritual and the bodily do not live in separate compartments – they are dimensions of the whole human beings that we all are. In the giving and receiving which is the breathing in and out of the grace of God, may we be open doors of mercy in ourselves – doors that open in gratitude and thankfulness who come bringing gifts to us, and doors that open in hospitality and generosity to those who need our shelter, so that we are indeed able to offer 20,000, 50,000, any number of welcomes.

%d bloggers like this: