Posted in coronavirus, Mothering Sunday

God’s touch

This is the first Mothering Sunday for quite a while when I won’t be able to see my mum, and give her a huge hug. She’s 97, and the risk of visiting is just too great. But I’ll miss it a lot, and I know so will she. We’ll Skype each other, but it’s not the same without being able to touch.
Touching and being touched are fundamental to our humanity. From a handshake to an intimate embrace, the meeting of flesh to flesh binds us together. It was a sign of their dehumanisation and exclusion from society that the Dalit people in India were known as ‘the untouchables’; touch is a powerful force for binding us together. That of course is why intrusive or predatory touching is so dangerous: the power of touch can be used to break down as well as to build up. But the answer is not to stop: the answer is to use touch to express love and respect, to honour one another for all that we are as God’s children.
And now we are in a time when touch is dangerous, when even being too close to one another carries great risks. On this Mothering Sunday, a day for hugs and kisses, we are being advised for our own good, and for the good of us all, to step back, to keep our distance. We should not underestimate how hard that may be, for ourselves, whether or not we think of our selves as touchy-feely types, and for those around us. But it is still what we need to do, for our own good and the good of our society.
But there is of course another dimension to Mothering Sunday, which makes it more than Mother’s Day, and maybe also means that we can still know that we are, held, embraced, even hugged. The love that we celebrate today in giving thanks for mothers, and for those who show that same quality, mothers or not, is a reflection of the nurturing, creative, caring love of the God who holds all things in his hands. Jesus reflected that in his ministry – he healed by touch, he blessed by touch, he forgave and reassured by touch.
By the gift of his Spirit, Jesus still touches us; resurrected and in glory, he can enfold the whole world in his embrace. He prays for us constantly and brings us into the relationship of love which binds together Father, Son and Holy Spirit. That remains as true now as it ever has been, but the means by which we are often experience that closeness of God are temporarily taken away from us. Most of us can’t gather at the Lord’s table; we can’t greet each other with a touch at the Peace; we can’t even gossip over a cup of coffee – and it is usually through that closeness and contact, through sharing in eating and drinking together, that we also know the closeness of God. But the fact that those things aren’t there makes no difference to the big truth – God still offers us his touch, his embrace.
However separated we might be, we are still all joining together spiritually around the throne of grace. God’s nurturing, maternal love is poured out on us, wherever we are. Spiritually – which means at the deepest, truest level – we are all united together in Christ as his brothers and sisters. Spiritually, we all equally receive the sacrament of his presence. Spiritually, he takes us all in his arms and blesses us.
As we receive that blessing in our own lives, let us also seek the ways in which we can be a blessing to others. In whatever way we can, let us share the touch of God.