Posted in refugees

Welcome to Britain! Here’s the bill

The UK’s Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration is investigating the Home Office’s charging for services in respect of its asylum, immigration, nationality and customs functions. Still bothering to read? You should be.

So, imagine you are a refugee who has recently been granted leave to remain in the UK, you and your spouse and children. You may well have had a senior and well-paid job in your country of origin, but in all likelihood you arrived here with nothing, and your qualifications aren’t recognised in this country. But this is where you want to belong, where you want to be your home country, the place to which you are committed for life. So you take whatever work you can, probably minimum wage, but better than nothing. You get along, just, from month to month, but it’s a struggle.

And then, naturally enough, you want to express that commitment by becoming a British citizen. You realise these processes aren’t completely free. And being of an enquiring turn of mind, you find out about other countries too, just out of interest. If you were in Belgium, it would cost you €200 (currently about £177). If you were in the United States, it would cost you $725 (about £550). In France it’s just €55. And in the UK – £1,330. And if you make one mistake on your form, the application will be turned down without refund. Children are a bargain at a mere £1,012.

You’re told that this is because of the great benefits that citizenship will bring you. and you wonder – is UK citizenship really 27 times more valuable than French? And you also  think – that’s all very well if you’ve got capital to invest, but I don’t, and no-one is yet offering low interest loans on citizenship application fees to people on low and precarious incomes.

You know already, through personal experience, that the UK makes it tough for anyone who wants to get here to claim asylum, unless you’re lucky enough to be included in one of the resettlement programmes. But you’re through that now; no need for a hostile (or even ‘compliant’) environment any more. So what’s all this about?

You try to do some research – and you find a quotation from a research project which makes you even more perplexed:

Research has demonstrated that achieving citizenship is important in migrant integration and social cohesion, among other benefits for both migrants and communities in which they live; cultivating a loyalty amongst migrants for their new home country and its values

So do the government not want me to be loyal? Do they not want me to become integrated into my new society? Do they really, still, not want me at all?

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